Mews House

This project in North London was created with the intention of enhancing the housing stock of the location and providing a positive contribution to the texture, grain and building types within the conservation area.

Architects Russell Jones Architects, UK
Location London, UK
Construction period November 2014 - October 2015
Awards
Brick 18, Nomination category: Feeling at home
BDA Winner: Architects’ Choice Award 2017
Purpose Housing
Usable floor area 68 m²
Brick type Facing bricks
Product Marziale

 

The two-storey brick house faces a quiet cobbled mews. At the rear of a listed building, it sits amongst a patchwork of rear fenced off gardens, garages, mews houses and ad-hoc rear ad-ons. Originally a decrepit back-land area, the location is now gradually developing into a secluded residential enclave.

In the Highgate area of London, architects converted a former mews house into a new residential property. They planned to build a two-storey house with an area of 70 square metres on a site of a mere 90 square meters. The challenge was to avoid introducing spatial upheaval and to focus on the essential.

Downstairs, there is a living room with a kitchen that provides access to a small courtyard, which features special details such as niches for decorative elements. On the first floor, there are two small rooms with space-saving built-in furniture and a bathroom. For the construction of the walls, the architects used yellowish bricks with an extravagant surface, which was covered in a grey-white mortar.

The architects carefully positioned the windows to bring enough light into the house, which is surrounded by other multi-storey buildings, while ensuring privacy. The whole building is characterised by clever details like bright wood or colour-matched elements. Thanks to precise planning, the architects accomplished the very best with this small space.

Products

 
The quality of the brickwork has been enhanced through the use of a carefully selected mortar, using white cement, lime and washed river sand and a subtle manipulation of the surface.

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Mews House, United Kingdom © Rory Gardiner

Related articles